diastole

[dahy-as-tl-ee, -tl-ee]
noun
1.
Physiology. the normal rhythmical dilatation of the heart during which the chambers are filling with blood. Compare systole ( def 1 ).
2.
Prosody. the lengthening of a syllable regularly short, especially before a pause or at the ictus.

Origin:
1570–80; < Late Latin diastolē < Greek diastolḗ a putting asunder, dilation, lengthening; compare diastéllein to set apart, equivalent to dia- dia- + stéllein to put, place

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World English Dictionary
diastole (daɪˈæstəlɪ)
 
n
Compare systole the dilatation of the chambers of the heart that follows each contraction, during which they refill with blood
 
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek: an expansion, from diastellein to expand, from dia- + stellein to place, bring together, make ready]
 
diastolic
 
adj

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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

diastole di·as·to·le (dī-ās'tə-lē)
n.
The normal rhythmically occurring relaxation and dilatation of the heart chambers, especially the ventricles, during which they fill with blood.


di'a·stol'ic (dī'ə-stŏl'ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
diastole   (dī-ās'tə-lē)  Pronunciation Key 
The period during the normal beating of the heart in which the chambers of the heart dilate and fill with blood. Diastole of the atria occurs before diastole of the ventricles. Compare systole.

diastolic adjective (dī'ə-stŏl'ĭk)
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Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

diastole

in the cardiac cycle, period of relaxation of the heart muscle, accompanied by the filling of the chambers with blood. Diastole is followed in the cardiac cycle by a period of contraction, or systole (q.v.), of the heart muscle. Initially both atria and ventricles are in diastole, and there is a period of rapid filling of the ventricles followed by a brief atrial systole. At the same time, there is a corresponding decrease in arterial blood pressure to its minimum (diastolic blood pressure), normally about 80 mm of mercury in humans. Ventricular diastole again occurs after the blood has been ejected (during ventricular systole) into the aorta and pulmonary artery.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
The heart chamber grows too small and too stiff to fill completely during diastole, the heart's relaxation-and-filling phase.
To be relaxed is good if it is part of a process of systole and diastole.
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