dictation

[dik-tey-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act or manner of dictating for reproduction in writing.
2.
the act or manner of transcribing words uttered by another.
3.
words that are dictated or that are reproduced from dictation.
4.
the playing or singing of music to be notated by a listener, especially as a technique of training the ear.
5.
music notated from dictation.
6.
the act of commanding arbitrarily.
7.
something commanded.

Origin:
1650–60; < Late Latin dictātiōn- (stem of dictātiō) a dictating < Latin dictāt(us) (see dictate) + -iōn- -ion

dictational, adjective
nondictation, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
dictation (dɪkˈteɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act of dictating material to be recorded or taken down in writing
2.  the material dictated
3.  authoritative commands or the act of giving them
 
dic'tational
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dictation
1727, from L.L. dictationem, noun of action from dictare (see dictate).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Because it challenges our view of writers as solitary artists taking dictation
  from the muse.
Seems they didn't have enough time to wait to do dictation in the car.
The students likely copied down poems from other texts and dictation as part of
  their lessons.
Dictation is still a lot faster way to get data in, but harder to get data out.
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