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digest

[v. dih-jest, dahy-; n. dahy-jest] /v. dɪˈdʒɛst, daɪ-; n. ˈdaɪ dʒɛst/
verb (used with object)
1.
to convert (food) in the alimentary canal into absorbable form for assimilation into the system.
2.
to promote the digestion of (food).
3.
to obtain information, ideas, or principles from; assimilate mentally:
to digest a pamphlet on nuclear waste.
4.
to arrange methodically in the mind; think over:
to digest a plan.
5.
to bear with patience; endure.
6.
to arrange in convenient or methodical order; reduce to a system; classify.
7.
to condense, abridge, or summarize.
8.
Chemistry. to soften or disintegrate (a substance) by means of moisture, heat, chemical action, or the like.
verb (used without object)
9.
to digest food.
10.
to undergo digestion, as food.
noun
11.
a collection or compendium, usually of literary, historical, legal, or scientific matter, especially when classified or condensed.
12.
Law.
  1. a systematic abstract of some body of law.
  2. the Digest, a collection in fifty books of excerpts, especially from the writings of the Classical Roman jurists, compiled by order of Justinian in the 6th century a.d.; the Pandects.
13.
Biochemistry. the product of the action of an enzyme on food or other organic material.
Origin of digest
1350-1400
1350-1400; (v.) Middle English digesten < Latin dīgestus separated, dissolved (past participle of dīgerere), equivalent to dī- di-2 + ges- carry, bear (base of gerere) + -tus past participle suffix; (noun) Middle English: collection of laws < Late Latin dīgesta (plural), Latin: collection of writings, neuter plural of dīgestus, as above
Related forms
digestedly, adverb
digestedness, noun
half-digested, adjective
nondigesting, adjective
overdigest, verb
redigest, verb (used with object)
semidigested, adjective
undigested, adjective
undigesting, adjective
well-digested, adjective
Synonyms
4. understand; study, ponder. 6. systematize, codify. 11. epitome, abridgment. See summary.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the web for digest
  • After gorging itself, the colo retreats to its cave dwelling to hibernate and digest.
British Dictionary definitions for digest

digest

verb (dɪˈdʒɛst; daɪ-)
1.
to subject (food) to a process of digestion
2.
(transitive) to assimilate mentally
3.
(chem) to soften or disintegrate or be softened or disintegrated by the action of heat, moisture, or chemicals; decompose
4.
(transitive) to arrange in a methodical or systematic order; classify
5.
(transitive) to reduce to a summary
6.
(transitive) (archaic) to tolerate
noun (ˈdaɪdʒɛst)
7.
a comprehensive and systematic compilation of information or material, often condensed
8.
a magazine, periodical, etc, that summarizes news of current events
9.
a compilation of rules of law based on decided cases
Word Origin
C14: from Late Latin dīgesta writings grouped under various heads, from Latin dīgerere to divide, from di- apart + gerere to bear

Digest

/ˈdaɪdʒɛst/
noun
1.
(Roman law) an arrangement of excerpts from the writings and opinions of eminent lawyers, contained in 50 books compiled by order of Justinian in the sixth century ad
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for digest
n.

"collection of writing," late 14c., from Latin digesta, from neuter plural of digestus, literally "digested thing," noun use of past participle of digerere "to separate, divide, arrange," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + gerere "to carry" (see gest).

v.

"assimilate food in bowels," late 14c., from Latin digestus (see digest (n.)). Related: Digested; digesting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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digest in Medicine

digest di·gest (dī-jěst', dĭ-)
v. di·gest·ed, di·gest·ing, di·gests

  1. To convert food into simpler chemical compounds that can be absorbed and assimilated by the body, as by chemical and muscular action in the alimentary canal.

  2. To soften or disintegrate by means of chemical action, heat, or moisture.


di·gest'i·bil'i·ty n.
di·gest'i·ble adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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digest in Technology


A periodical collection of messages which have been posted to a newsgroup or mailing list. A digest is prepared by a moderator who selects articles from the group or list, formats them and adds a contents list. The digest is then either mailed to an alternative mailing list or posted to an alternative newsgroup.
Some news readers and electronic mail programs provide commands to "undigestify" a digest, i.e. to split it up into individual articles which may then be read and saved or discarded separately.

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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