digression

[dih-gresh-uhn, dahy-]
noun
1.
the act of digressing.
2.
a passage or section that deviates from the central theme in speech or writing.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin dīgressiōn- (stem of dīgressiō) a going away, aside, equivalent to dīgress(us) (see digress) + -iōn- -ion

digressional, digressionary, adjective


1, 2. deviation, divergence.
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World English Dictionary
digression (daɪˈɡrɛʃən)
 
n
an act or instance of digressing from a main subject in speech or writing
 
digressional
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

digression
late 14c., from L. digressionem, from digredi "to deviate," from dis- "apart, aside" + gradi "to step, go."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Under these conditions, diversion and instruction are diametrically opposed,
  and digression has no place in the classroom.
To him, life is a flow, a simultaneous progression and digression.
This was something of a digression from the main stream of his work.
His jokes, his quarrelsomeness and his weakness for digression are a drawback.
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