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diktat

[dik-taht] /dɪkˈtɑt/
noun
1.
a harsh, punitive settlement or decree imposed unilaterally on a defeated nation, political party, etc.
2.
any decree or authoritative statement:
The Board of Education issued a diktat that all employees must report an hour earlier.
Origin
1930-1935
1930-35; < German: literally, something dictated < Latin dictātus, past participle of dictāre to dictate
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for diktat
  • Surely, then, it should be put to a vote rather than being enacted via bureaucratic diktat.
  • Nowadays the price of gold is set by the market rather than by official diktat.
  • The alternative to euro-zone diktat is being abandoned to the market.
  • They have become the only part of the economy driven mainly by supply and demand, rather than diktat.
  • At no point in history has any language's evolution been sustained by diktat alone.
British Dictionary definitions for diktat

diktat

/ˈdɪktɑːt/
noun
1.
decree or settlement imposed, esp by a ruler or a victorious nation
2.
a dogmatic statement
Word Origin
German: dictation, from Latin dictātum, from dictāre to dictate
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for diktat
n.

1933, from German Diktat "dictate."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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