dilapidate

[dih-lap-i-deyt]
verb (used with object), dilapidated, dilapidating.
1.
to cause or allow (a building, automobile, etc.) to fall into a state of disrepair, as by misuse or neglect (often used passively): The house had been dilapidated by neglect.
2.
Archaic. to squander; waste.
verb (used without object), dilapidated, dilapidating.
3.
to fall into ruin or decay.

Origin:
1560–70; < Medieval Latin dīlapidātus, past participle of dīlapidāre to squander (compare dīlapidātiō disrepair), Latin: to pelt with stones; see di-2, lapidate

dilapidation, noun
dilapidator, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
dilapidate (dɪˈlæpɪˌdeɪt)
 
vb
to fall or cause to fall into ruin or decay
 
[C16: from Latin dīlapidāre to scatter, waste, from dis- apart + lapidāre to stone, throw stones, from lapis stone]

dilapidation (dɪˌlæpɪˈdeɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the state of being or becoming dilapidated
2.  (often plural) property law
 a.  the state of disrepair of premises at the end of a tenancy due to neglect
 b.  the extent of repairs necessary to such premises
 
di'lapidator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dilapidation
early 15c., from L.L. dilapidationem, from L. dilapidare "pelt with stones, ruin, destroy," from dis- "asunder" + lapidare "throw stones at," from lapis (gen. lapidis) "stone." "Taken in Eng. in a more literal sense than was usual in Latin" [OED].

dilapidate
1560s, from L. dilapidare, originally "to throw stones;" see dilapidation.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Yet all this was apart from any extraordinary dilapidation.
What is striking is the level of total dilapidation.
Even government buildings have reached advanced stages of dilapidation.
His over-all dilapidation was more familiar than alarming.
Synonyms
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