dimethoate

[dahy-meth-oh-eyt]
noun Chemistry.
a highly toxic crystalline compound, C 5 H 12 NO 3 PS 2 , used as an insecticide.

Origin:
1955–60; probably dimeth(yl) + -(thi)oate, components of the chemical name

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Encyclopedia Britannica
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dimethoate

any systemic insecticide that acts by inhibiting cholinesterases, enzymes involved in transmitting nerve impulses. Chemically, it is an organophosphate. Like all organophosphates it is related to the nerve gases and is among the most toxic of all pesticides to vertebrates, including humans. As a systemic, dimethoate is taken up into the roots of plants and translocated to aboveground parts, where it is toxic to any sucking insect feeding on the plant juices (e.g., aphids, leafhoppers, and thrips). Caterpillars and other chewing pests are not killed by dimethoate because not enough juice-containing tissue is ingested to be effective

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Dimethoate is a systemic organophosphate insecticide.
Four trials were conducted, with two paired trials each for dicofol and dimethoate.
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