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diminish

[dih-min-ish] /dɪˈmɪn ɪʃ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to make or cause to seem smaller, less, less important, etc.; lessen; reduce.
2.
Architecture. to give (a column) a form tapering inward from bottom to top.
3.
Music. to make (an interval) smaller by a chromatic half step than the corresponding perfect or minor interval.
4.
to detract from the authority, honor, stature, or reputation of; disparage.
verb (used without object)
5.
to lessen; decrease.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English; blend of diminuen (< Anglo-French diminuer < Medieval Latin dīminuere for Latin dēminuere to make smaller) and minishen minish
Related forms
diminishable, adjective
diminishment, noun
nondiminishing, adjective
prediminish, verb (used with object)
prediminishment, noun
undiminishable, adjective
undiminishableness, noun
undiminishably, adverb
undiminished, adjective
undiminishing, adjective
Synonyms
5. See decrease.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for diminish
  • He has done nothing to diminish the demands before the start of a professional career.
  • For this very reason, though, inequality among nations diminishes too.
  • Unfortunately, the payoffs diminish as the story wears on.
  • Those who were selfish and well-connected saw their reputation diminish.
  • However, they stressed it did not diminish their support for the international air campaign.
  • However, this casual attitude does not diminish the utility of the tiny tome.
  • Of course, the fact should be kept in mind that these are air tanks, not to be used so as to appreciably diminish their buoyancy.
  • Already, the nation had diminished in population and territory.
  • Such carelessness can only diminish the book's credibility.
  • Disruptions of any kind diminish the learning process.
British Dictionary definitions for diminish

diminish

/dɪˈmɪnɪʃ/
verb
1.
to make or become smaller, fewer, or less
2.
(transitive) (architect) to cause (a column, etc) to taper
3.
(transitive) (music) to decrease (a minor or perfect interval) by a semitone
4.
to belittle or be belittled; reduce in authority, status, etc; depreciate
Derived Forms
diminishable, adjective
diminishingly, adverb
diminishment, noun
Word Origin
C15: blend of diminuen to lessen (from Latin dēminuere to make smaller, from minuere to reduce) + archaic minish to lessen
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for diminish
v.

early 15c., from merger of two obsolete verbs, diminue and minish. Diminue is from Old French diminuer "make small," from Latin diminuere "break into small pieces," variant of deminuere "lessen, diminish," from de- "completely" + minuere "make small" (see minus).

Minish is from Old French menuisier, from Latin minuere. Related: Diminished; diminishes; diminishing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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