ding

1 [ding]
verb (used with object)
1.
to cause to make a ringing sound.
2.
to speak about insistently.
verb (used without object)
3.
to make a ringing sound.
4.
to talk insistently.
noun
5.
a ringing sound.

Origin:
1575–85; see ding-dong

Dictionary.com Unabridged

ding

2 [ding] Informal.
verb (used with object)
1.
to cause surface damage to; dent: Flying gravel had dinged the car's fenders.
2.
to strike with force; hit: The catcher was dinged on the shoulder by a wild throw.
3.
to blackball: Only one freshman was dinged by the fraternity.
noun
4.
dent; nick: The surfboard has a few dings in it from scraping over rocks.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English dingen, dengen, probably Old English *dingan; akin to Old English dencgan, Old Norse dengja

Darling

[dahr-ling]
noun
Jay Norwood [nawr-wood] , ("Ding") 1876–1962, U.S. political cartoonist.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
darling (ˈdɑːlɪŋ)
 
n
1.  a person very much loved: often used as a term of address
2.  a favourite: the teacher's darling
 
adj
3.  beloved
4.  much admired; pleasing: a darling hat
 
[Old English dēorling; see dear, -ling1]

Darling (ˈdɑːlɪŋ)
 
n
Grace. 1815--42, English national heroine, famous for her rescue (1838) of some shipwrecked sailors with her father, a lighthouse keeper

ding1 (dɪŋ)
 
vb
1.  to ring or cause to ring, esp with tedious repetition
2.  (tr) another word for din
 
n
3.  an imitation or representation of the sound of a bell
4.  informal (Austral) a party or social event
 
[C13: probably of imitative origin, but influenced by din1 + ring²; compare Old Swedish diunga to beat]

ding2 (dɪŋ)
 
vb
1.  to strike; dash down
2.  to surpass
 
[Middle English dingen]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

darling
O.E. deorling, double dim. of deor "dear." The vowel shift from -e- to -a- (16c.) is usual for -er- followed by a consonant. "It is better to be An olde mans derlyng, than a yong mans werlyng" (1562).

ding
1819, "to sound as metal when struck," possibly abstracted from ding-dong (1659), of imitative origin. The verb meaning "to deal heavy blows" is c.1300, probably from O.N. dengja "to hammer." Meaning "dent" is 1960s. Dinger "something superlative" (e.g. humdinger) is from 1809, Amer.Eng. Ding-a-ling
"one who is crazy" is 1935, from notion of hearing bells in the head.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

ding definition


1. Synonym for feep. Usage: rare among hackers, but commoner in the Real World.
2. "dinged": What happens when someone in authority gives you a minor bitching about something, especially something trivial. "I was dinged for having a messy desk."
[Jargon File]

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Darling definition


Ps. 22:20; 35:17) means an "only one."

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

ding

type of ancient Chinese cooking or holding vessel, usually with two handles on the rim, that is supported by three or four columnar legs.

Learn more about ding with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
The number of points attendance is worth would only ding you a letter grade.
Every time you ding, you're given the choice of upgrade cards.
The annual ding-dong over bank bonuses is under way.
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