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[dip-luh-mat] /ˈdɪp ləˌmæt/
a person appointed by a national government to conduct official negotiations and maintain political, economic, and social relations with another country or countries.
a person who is tactful and skillful in managing delicate situations, handling people, etc.
Origin of diplomat
1805-15; < French diplomate, back formation from diplomatique diplomatic
Can be confused
diplomat, diplomate. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for diplomat
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The diplomat twirled his mustache and smiled, as only diplomats can.

    Spanish Highways and Byways Katharine Lee Bates
  • You should have been a diplomat, Croyden—nothing less than an Ambassadorship for you, my boy!

    In Her Own Right John Reed Scott
  • A lawyer and a diplomat, the Frenchman's brutal frankness jarred on his nerves.

    The Hill of Venus Nathan Gallizier
  • The large group, in which were Prince Vasili and the generals, had the benefit of the diplomat.

    War and Peace Leo Tolstoy
  • He shall serve either humanity or his country; the one as a minister of the Gospel, the other as a diplomat.

British Dictionary definitions for diplomat


an official, such as an ambassador or first secretary, engaged in diplomacy
a person who deals with people tactfully or skilfully
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for diplomat

1813, from French diplomate, a back-formation from diplomatique (see diplomatic) on model of aristocrate from aristocratique.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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