directive

[dih-rek-tiv, dahy-]
adjective
1.
serving to direct; directing: a directive board.
2.
Psychology. pertaining to a type of psychotherapy in which the therapist actively offers advice and information rather than dealing only with information supplied by the patient.
noun
3.
an authoritative instruction or direction; specific order: a new directive by the president on foreign aid.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English < Medieval Latin dīrēctīvus. See direct, -ive

self-directive, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To directives
Collins
World English Dictionary
directive (dɪˈrɛktɪv, daɪ-)
 
n
1.  an instruction; order
 
adj
2.  tending to direct; directing
3.  indicating direction

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

directive
1590s (adj.); 1640s (n.); from M.L. directivus, from direct-, pp. stem of dirigere (see direct).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
But one hospital has made a special effort to help patients who lack written
  advance directives.
Yes, the directives seemed to come without rhyme or reason.
Almost every day brings word of policy directives, large and small, that are
  apparently driven by restrictionist impulses.
The attorney set up living trusts and health care directives for us.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;