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dis-1

1.
a Latin prefix meaning “apart,” “asunder,” “away,” “utterly,” or having a privative, negative, or reversing force (see de-, un-2. ); used freely, especially with these latter senses, as an English formative:
disability; disaffirm; disbar; disbelief; discontent; dishearten; dislike; disown.
Also, di-.
Origin
< Latin (akin to bis, Greek dís twice); before f, dif-; before some consonants, di-; often replacing obsolete des- < Old French

dis-2

1.
variant of di-1. before s: dissyllable.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for dis-
  • Often, the whole lecturing type environment might of a dis-service to students of today.
  • And thus she is not dis-honoured by their conduct, which appears holy.
  • It was an eye-opener, with virtuoso dis-plays of color at every turn.
  • Any aggression should always be dis-allowed and corrected.
  • Belief or dis-belief in an afterlife can work both ways.
  • Only well-designed research, executed well, can help dis-entangle these things.
  • And, a true dis-service to those that could certainly benefit from it.
  • Clearly trying to inform the public with bad information is not doing them a service, but a dis-service.
  • It's not dis-provable, which is a necessary aspect of science.
  • If it's so bad, let's convince people who benefit from it to dis-enroll.
British Dictionary definitions for dis-

dis-1

prefix
1.
indicating reversal disconnect, disembark
2.
indicating negation, lack, or deprivation dissimilar, distrust, disgrace
3.
indicating removal or release disembowel, disburden
4.
expressing intensive force dissever
Word Origin
from Latin dis- apart; in some cases, via Old French des-. In compound words of Latin origin, dis- becomes dif- before f and di- before some consonants

dis-2

combining form
1.
variant of di-1 dissyllable
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dis-

(assimilated as dif- before -f-, to di- before most voiced consonants), word-forming element meaning 1. "lack of, not" (e.g. dishonest); 2. "do the opposite of" (e.g. disallow); 3. "apart, away" (e.g. discard), from Old French des- or directly from Latin dis- "apart, in a different direction, between," figuratively "not, un-," also "exceedingly, utterly," from PIE *dis- "apart, asunder" (cf. Old English te-, Old Saxon ti-, Old High German ze-, German zer-).

The PIE root is a secondary form of *dwis- and thus is related to Latin bis "twice" (originally *dvis) and to duo, on notion of "two ways, in twain."

In classical Latin, dis- paralelled de- and had much the same meaning, but in Late Latin dis- came to be the favored form and this passed into Old French as des-, the form used for new compound words formed in Old French, where it increasingly had a privative sense ("not").

In English, many of these words eventually were altered back to dis-, while in French many have been altered back to de-. The usual confusion prevails.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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dis- in Medicine

dis- pref.

  1. Not: disjugate.

  2. Absence of; opposite of: disorientation.

  3. Undo; do the opposite of: dislocate.

  4. Deprive of; remove: dismember.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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