disbar

[dis-bahr]
verb (used with object), disbarred, disbarring.
to expel from the legal profession or from the bar of a particular court.

Origin:
1625–35; dis-1 + bar1

disbarment, noun
undisbarred, adjective


debar, suspend, exclude.
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World English Dictionary
disbar (dɪsˈbɑː)
 
vb , -bars, -barring, -barred
to deprive of the status of barrister; expel from the Bar
 
usage  Disbar is sometimes wrongly used where debar is meant: he was debarred (not disbarred) from attending meetings
 
dis'barment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disbar
"deprive of the privileges of a barrister," 1630s, from dis- "opposite of" (see dis-) + bar in the legal sense.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The odds remain that this criterion will not disbar any country from the euro.
It can also suspend the lawyer's license or disbar the lawyer.
In sum, there is no reason not to disbar the respondent.
Motion to lift stay and to grant request to reciprocally disbar.
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