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disenchant

[dis-en-chant, -chahnt] /ˌdɪs ɛnˈtʃænt, -ˈtʃɑnt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to rid of or free from enchantment, illusion, credulity, etc.; disillusion:
The harshness of everyday reality disenchanted him of his idealistic hopes.
Origin of disenchant
1580-1590
1580-90; < Middle French desenchanter, equivalent to des- dis-1 + enchanter to enchant
Related forms
disenchanter, noun
disenchanting, adjective
disenchantingly, adverb
disenchantment, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for disenchanted
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • A lonely, disenchanted woman, without any ties or hold on life, she found herself now on the verge of forty.

    Lola Montez Edmund B. d'Auvergne
  • The most marvellous powers are to be disenchanted from vibrations as yet inaudible.

    Child and Country Will Levington Comfort
  • He wondered who she was, and how she looked, and was humiliated to reflect how disenchanted she would be if she could see him.

    The Quaint Companions Leonard Merrick
  • Each must be disenchanted, and walk forth to the day in human shape.

  • I calmed myself by saying that this strong impression was due to novelty, and by hoping that I should soon be disenchanted.

    The Memoires of Casanova, Complete Jacques Casanova de Seingalt
British Dictionary definitions for disenchanted

disenchanted

/ˌdɪsɪnˈtʃɑːntɪd/
adjective
1.
disappointed or disillusioned

disenchant

/ˌdɪsɪnˈtʃɑːnt/
verb
1.
(transitive; when passive, foll by with or by) to make disappointed or disillusioned: she is disenchanted with the marriage
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for disenchanted

disenchant

v.

1580s, from Middle French desenchanter (13c.), from des- (see dis-) + enchanter "to enchant" (see enchant). Related: Disenchanted; disenchanting; disenchantment. Carlyle coined disenchantress (1831).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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