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disgust

[dis-guhst, dih-skuhst] /dɪsˈgʌst, dɪˈskʌst/
verb (used with object)
1.
to cause loathing or nausea in.
2.
to offend the good taste, moral sense, etc., of; cause extreme dislike or revulsion in:
Your vulgar remarks disgust me.
noun
3.
a strong distaste; nausea; loathing.
4.
repugnance caused by something offensive; strong aversion:
He left the room in disgust.
Origin
1590-1600
1590-1600; (v.) < Middle French desgouster, equivalent to des- dis-1 + gouster to taste, relish, derivative of goust taste < Latin gusta (see choose); (noun) < Middle French desgoust, derivative of the v.
Related forms
disgustedly, adverb
disgustedness, noun
predisgust, noun
quasi-disgusted, adjective
quasi-disgustedly, adverb
self-disgust, noun
undisgusted, adjective
Can be confused
discussed, disgust.
Synonyms
1. sicken, nauseate. 2. repel, revolt. 4. abhorrence, detestation, antipathy. See dislike.
Antonyms
1. delight. 4. relish.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for disgust
  • The psychology of disgust can sway election results.
  • In a previous study, researchers found a connection between disgust and conservatism.
  • The whole world is watching your country with mixed feelings of disgust and sympathy.
  • In the desert, spirituous liquors excite only disgust.
  • disgust directs us to push out and expel that which is bad for us.
  • Initial reactions to both workshops ranged from support to disgust.
  • Probably the answer lies in a cross-wiring between our senses of morality and disgust.
  • My disgust with for-profit colleges is their neglect of basics necessities for students.
  • Those who haven't left the party in disgust by now are inspired by mean-spirited hostility.
  • We recognize emotions from sadness to disgust more readily on our own faces than in the same expressions made by others.
British Dictionary definitions for disgust

disgust

/dɪsˈɡʌst/
verb (transitive)
1.
to sicken or fill with loathing
2.
to offend the moral sense, principles, or taste of
noun
3.
a great loathing or distaste aroused by someone or something
4.
in disgust, as a result of disgust
Derived Forms
disgustedly, adverb
disgustedness, noun
Word Origin
C16: from Old French desgouster, from des-dis-1 + gouster to taste, from goust taste, from Latin gustus
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for disgust
n.

1590s, from Middle French desgoust "strong dislike, repugnance," literally "distaste" (16c., Modern French dégoût), from desgouster "have a distaste for," from des- "opposite of" (see dis-) + gouster "taste," from Latin gustare "to taste" (see gusto).

v.

c.1600, from Middle French desgouster "have a distaste for" (see disgust (n.)). Sense has strengthened over time, and subject and object have been reversed: cf. "It is not very palatable, which makes some disgust it" (1660s). The reverse sense of "to excite nausea" is attested from 1640s. Related: Disgusted; disgusting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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