disillusion

[dis-i-loo-zhuhn]
verb (used with object)
1.
to free from or deprive of illusion, belief, idealism, etc.; disenchant.
noun
2.
a freeing or a being freed from illusion or conviction; disenchantment.

Origin:
1590–1600; dis-1 + illusion

disillusionment, noun
disillusive [dis-i-loo-siv] , adjective
undisillusioned, adjective


1. disabuse, disenthrall, undeceive, disappoint.
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World English Dictionary
disillusion (ˌdɪsɪˈluːʒən)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to destroy the ideals, illusions, or false ideas of
 
n
2.  the act of disillusioning or the state of being disillusioned

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disillusion
"to free or be freed from illusion," 1851, from dis- + illusion (q.v.). Related: Disillusioned; disillusionment.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
To see a poet near at hand, to see him in his own home, is generally matter for
  disillusion.
After long conflicts, the second set of elections is often a story of
  unrealistic expectation turned to disillusion and apathy.
Artificial intelligence has gone through these cycles of optimism and hype
  followed by disillusion and collapse.
There is less disillusion here than continuing rage.
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