disloyal

[dis-loi-uhl]
adjective
false to one's obligations or allegiances; not loyal; faithless; treacherous.

Origin:
1470–80; < Middle French desloial, Old French desleal, equivalent to des- dis-1 + leal loyal

disloyalist, noun
disloyally, adverb


unfaithful, perfidious, traitorous, treasonable.
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World English Dictionary
disloyal (dɪsˈlɔɪəl)
 
adj
not loyal or faithful; deserting one's allegiance or duty
 
dis'loyally
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disloyal
late 15c., from O.Fr. desloial, from des- (see dis-) + loial (see loyal).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Even good publicity could make a banker uppity, disloyal and limelight-seeking.
How many fall into the disloyal categories is not known.
These figures are viewed as disloyal to the cause of conservatism.
No one who participates in this conversation should be branded as disloyal or a
  traitor.
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