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disorient

[dis-awr-ee-ent, -ohr-] /dɪsˈɔr iˌɛnt, -ˈoʊr-/
verb (used with object)
1.
to cause to lose one's way:
The strange streets disoriented him.
2.
to confuse by removing or obscuring something that has guided a person, group, or culture, as customs, moral standards, etc.:
Society has been disoriented by changing values.
3.
Psychiatry. to cause to lose perception of time, place, or one's personal identity.
Origin
1645-1655
1645-55; < French désorienter, equivalent to dés- dis-1 + orienter to orient
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for disorient
  • They help to orient the reader or sometimes, with intent, to disorient.
  • Researchers are trying to make a flashlight that would enable police to disorient or nauseate somebody they are trying to catch.
  • Night lights disorient hatching sea turtles, migrating birds and nocturnal animals.
  • Loud music, fog, strobe lights and dark areas are used to disorient guests.
  • One has to trust him, even while realizing that one of his methods of operation is to disorient us as thoroughly as possible.
  • They purposely did this to disorient us so they could have complete control.
  • Several hunting methods involve using air bubbles to herd, corral, or disorient fish.
  • Brightly lit cities can disorient the hatchlings causing them to head toward developed areas.
  • When thrown, the flash-bang creates a loud sound and bright flash of light to temporarily distract or disorient an adversary.
  • Artificial lights such as flashlights, lanterns, or campfires disorient hatchlings on their way to the ocean.
British Dictionary definitions for disorient

disorientate

/dɪsˈɔːrɪənˌteɪt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to cause (someone) to lose his bearings
2.
to perplex; confuse
Derived Forms
disorientation, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for disorient
disorient
1650s, from Fr. désorienter, from dés- "dis-" (see dis-) + orienter (see orient (v.)). Related: Disoriented; disorienting.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Difficulty index for disorient

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Word Value for disorient

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