dispossess

[dis-puh-zes]
verb (used with object)
1.
to put (a person) out of possession, especially of real property; oust.
2.
to banish.
3.
to abandon ownership of (a building), especially as a bad investment: Landlords have dispossessed many old tenement buildings.

Origin:
1425–75; dis-1 + possess; replacing Middle English disposseden, equivalent to dis-1 + posseden (< Old French posseder) < Latin possidēre; see possess

dispossession, noun
dispossessor, noun
dispossessory [dis-puh-zes-uh-ree] , adjective


1. See strip1.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
dispossess (ˌdɪspəˈzɛs)
 
vb
(tr) to take away possession of something, esp property; expel
 
dispos'session
 
n
 
dispos'sessor
 
n
 
dispos'sessory
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dispossess
late 15c., from O.Fr. despossesser "to dispossess," from des- "dis-" (see dis-) + possesser "possess" (see possess). Related: Dispossessed; dispossession.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
By paying rent early in the month, a dispossess and resulting legal action and fees can be avoided.
The dispossess can cross in the mail with your rent payment.
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