dispossess

[dis-puh-zes]
verb (used with object)
1.
to put (a person) out of possession, especially of real property; oust.
2.
to banish.
3.
to abandon ownership of (a building), especially as a bad investment: Landlords have dispossessed many old tenement buildings.

Origin:
1425–75; dis-1 + possess; replacing Middle English disposseden, equivalent to dis-1 + posseden (< Old French posseder) < Latin possidēre; see possess

dispossession, noun
dispossessor, noun
dispossessory [dis-puh-zes-uh-ree] , adjective


1. See strip1.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
dispossess (ˌdɪspəˈzɛs)
 
vb
(tr) to take away possession of something, esp property; expel
 
dispos'session
 
n
 
dispos'sessor
 
n
 
dispos'sessory
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dispossess
late 15c., from O.Fr. despossesser "to dispossess," from des- "dis-" (see dis-) + possesser "possess" (see possess). Related: Dispossessed; dispossession.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Others put it down to a burning resentment at that dispossession, and a void
  filled mainly by booze and drugs.
Immerse yourself in the story of the dispossession of any one group, and
  clarity dissolves.
What was a story of tragic loss and dispossession is now one of liberation from
  oppression.
He also appeals from the circuit court's denial of his claim for the damages
  that resulted from his wrongful dispossession.
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