dissimulation

[dih-sim-yuh-ley-shuhn]
noun
the act of dissimulating; feigning; hypocrisy.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English dissimulacioun (< Anglo-French) < Latin dissimulātiōn- (stem of dissimulātiō a feigning); see dis-1, simulation

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World English Dictionary
dissimulate (dɪˈsɪmjʊˌleɪt)
 
vb
to conceal (one's real feelings) by pretence
 
dissimu'lation
 
n
 
dis'simulative
 
adj
 
dis'simulator
 
n

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dissimulation
late 14c., from O.Fr. dissimulation, from L. dissimulationem, from dissimulare "conceal, disguise," from dis- "completely" + simulare "pretend, simulate" (see simulation).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

dissimulation dis·sim·u·la·tion (dĭ-sĭm'yə-lā'shən)
n.
Concealment of the truth about a situation, especially about a state of health, as by a malingerer.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
Not having it until 1949, it is possible that his publicly stated views about
  its unimportance were merely dissimulation.
For some productions, he has also designed costumes, learning more tricks of
  proportional dissimulation.
All goodness is dissimulation; all kindness deceit.
It had certainly taught him none of the arts of dissimulation or led him to
  cloak his ultimate objective.
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