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dissipate

[dis-uh-peyt] /ˈdɪs əˌpeɪt/
verb (used with object), dissipated, dissipating.
1.
to scatter in various directions; disperse; dispel.
2.
to spend or use wastefully or extravagantly; squander; deplete:
to dissipate one's talents; to dissipate a fortune on high living.
verb (used without object), dissipated, dissipating.
3.
to become scattered or dispersed; be dispelled; disintegrate:
The sun shone and the mist dissipated.
4.
to indulge in extravagant, intemperate, or dissolute pleasure.
Origin
1525-1535
1525-35; < Latin dissipātus (past participle of dissipāre, dissupāre to scatter); see -ate1
Related forms
dissipater, dissipator, noun
dissipative, adjective
dissipativity
[dis-uh-puh-tiv-i-tee] /ˌdɪs ə pəˈtɪv ɪ ti/ (Show IPA),
noun
nondissipative, adjective
Synonyms
1. See scatter. 3. disappear, vanish.
Antonyms
1, 3. unite.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for dissipates
  • In general, deeper earthquakes are less damaging because their energy dissipates before it reaches the surface.
  • Much of the resistance to improving their working conditions, especially from tenure-track faculty members, dissipates.
  • Add at the end of cooking, as heat dissipates flavor and aroma.
  • In each case, some of the tension between each pair dissipates by the end of the first episode.
  • Replace the lid and return the flame to medium once the skin dissipates.
  • As a storm dissipates, air between the cloud and the ground holds pockets of charge.
  • The dancers hug each other, all bright-eyed and happy, and the crowd dissipates into the desert.
  • The memory for images that is needed for the tests resembles a skill found in children, but which dissipates with age.
  • Even if the volcanic ash plume dissipates, experts say it's possible further disruptions are imminent.
  • Time dissipates to shining ether the solid angularity of facts.
British Dictionary definitions for dissipates

dissipate

/ˈdɪsɪˌpeɪt/
verb
1.
to exhaust or be exhausted by dispersion
2.
(transitive) to scatter or break up
3.
(intransitive) to indulge in the pursuit of pleasure
Derived Forms
dissipater, dissipator, noun
dissipative, adjective
Word Origin
C15: from Latin dissipāre to disperse, from dis-1 + supāre to throw
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dissipates

dissipate

v.

early 15c., from Latin dissipatus, past participle of dissipare "to spread abroad, scatter, disperse; squander, disintegrate," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + supare "to throw, scatter," from PIE *swep- "to throw, sling, cast" (cf. Lithuanian supu "to swing, rock," Old Church Slavonic supo "to strew"). Related: Dissipated; dissipates; dissipating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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