dissipated

[dis-uh-pey-tid]
adjective
indulging in or characterized by excessive devotion to pleasure; intemperate; dissolute.

Origin:
1600–10; dissipate + -ed2

dissipatedly, adverb
dissipatedness, noun
nondissipated, adjective
nondissipatedly, adverb
nondissipatedness, noun
undissipated, adjective
well-dissipated, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

dissipate

[dis-uh-peyt]
verb (used with object), dissipated, dissipating.
1.
to scatter in various directions; disperse; dispel.
2.
to spend or use wastefully or extravagantly; squander; deplete: to dissipate one's talents; to dissipate a fortune on high living.
verb (used without object), dissipated, dissipating.
3.
to become scattered or dispersed; be dispelled; disintegrate: The sun shone and the mist dissipated.
4.
to indulge in extravagant, intemperate, or dissolute pleasure.

Origin:
1525–35; < Latin dissipātus (past participle of dissipāre, dissupāre to scatter); see -ate1

dissipater, dissipator, noun
dissipative, adjective
dissipativity [dis-uh-puh-tiv-i-tee] , noun
nondissipative, adjective


1. See scatter. 3. disappear, vanish.


1, 3. unite.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To dissipated
Collins
World English Dictionary
dissipate (ˈdɪsɪˌpeɪt)
 
vb
1.  to exhaust or be exhausted by dispersion
2.  (tr) to scatter or break up
3.  (intr) to indulge in the pursuit of pleasure
 
[C15: from Latin dissipāre to disperse, from dis-1 + supāre to throw]
 
'dissipater
 
n
 
'dissipator
 
n
 
'dissipative
 
adj

dissipated (ˈdɪsɪˌpeɪtɪd)
 
adj
1.  indulging without restraint in the pursuit of pleasure; debauched
2.  wasted, scattered, or exhausted
 
'dissipatedly
 
adv
 
'dissipatedness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dissipate
1530s, from L. dissipatus, pp. of dissipare "disperse, squander, disintegrate," from dis- "apart" + supare "to throw, scatter." Related: Dissipated; dissipates; dissipating.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
There's a certain ghoulish excitement to all this, but it is quickly dissipated.
The joys of teaching can be quickly dissipated if the work environment is
  negative.
Over time, the zeal to sell big-enough chunks of these firms to enable them to
  become more independent has dissipated.
The best time to take a picture was in the evening, when the crowds dissipated
  and the boathouse closed.
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