follow Dictionary.com

Hone in vs. home in? What's the difference?

dissipated

[dis-uh-pey-tid] /ˈdɪs əˌpeɪ tɪd/
adjective
1.
indulging in or characterized by excessive devotion to pleasure; intemperate; dissolute.
Origin of dissipated
1600-1610
1600-10; dissipate + -ed2
Related forms
dissipatedly, adverb
dissipatedness, noun
nondissipated, adjective
nondissipatedly, adverb
nondissipatedness, noun
undissipated, adjective
well-dissipated, adjective

dissipate

[dis-uh-peyt] /ˈdɪs əˌpeɪt/
verb (used with object), dissipated, dissipating.
1.
to scatter in various directions; disperse; dispel.
2.
to spend or use wastefully or extravagantly; squander; deplete:
to dissipate one's talents; to dissipate a fortune on high living.
verb (used without object), dissipated, dissipating.
3.
to become scattered or dispersed; be dispelled; disintegrate:
The sun shone and the mist dissipated.
4.
to indulge in extravagant, intemperate, or dissolute pleasure.
Origin
1525-35; < Latin dissipātus (past participle of dissipāre, dissupāre to scatter); see -ate1
Related forms
dissipater, dissipator, noun
dissipative, adjective
dissipativity
[dis-uh-puh-tiv-i-tee] /ˌdɪs ə pəˈtɪv ɪ ti/ (Show IPA),
noun
nondissipative, adjective
Synonyms
1. See scatter. 3. disappear, vanish.
Antonyms
1, 3. unite.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for dissipated
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • This modification occurring in individuals is dissipated rather rapidly, especially when the chain of experimenters is broken.

    Mysterious Psychic Forces Camille Flammarion
  • Your bottle is broken, and the material it contained is dissipated.

  • Her eyes, which had already lost much of the dissipated look, were alight with exaltation.

  • Wild, dissipated, reckless, he was dismissed from West Point.

  • Some years ago a moustache was looked upon by serious English people as decidedly reckless and dissipated.

    Mystic London: Charles Maurice Davies
British Dictionary definitions for dissipated

dissipated

/ˈdɪsɪˌpeɪtɪd/
adjective
1.
indulging without restraint in the pursuit of pleasure; debauched
2.
wasted, scattered, or exhausted
Derived Forms
dissipatedly, adverb
dissipatedness, noun

dissipate

/ˈdɪsɪˌpeɪt/
verb
1.
to exhaust or be exhausted by dispersion
2.
(transitive) to scatter or break up
3.
(intransitive) to indulge in the pursuit of pleasure
Derived Forms
dissipater, dissipator, noun
dissipative, adjective
Word Origin
C15: from Latin dissipāre to disperse, from dis-1 + supāre to throw
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for dissipated

dissipate

v.

early 15c., from Latin dissipatus, past participle of dissipare "to spread abroad, scatter, disperse; squander, disintegrate," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + supare "to throw, scatter," from PIE *swep- "to throw, sling, cast" (cf. Lithuanian supu "to swing, rock," Old Church Slavonic supo "to strew"). Related: Dissipated; dissipates; dissipating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for dissipated

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for dissipated

14
15
Scrabble Words With Friends