dissuasion

[dih-swey-zhuhn]
noun
an act or instance of dissuading.

Origin:
1520–30; < Latin dissuāsiōn- (stem of dissuāsiō) a speaking against, equivalent to dissuās(us) (past participle of dissuādēre; dissuād- (see dissuade) + -tus past participle suffix) + -iōn- -ion

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World English Dictionary
dissuade (dɪˈsweɪd)
 
vb
1.  (often foll by from) to deter (someone) by persuasion from a course of action, policy, etc
2.  to advise against (an action, etc)
 
[C15: from Latin dissuādēre, from dis-1 + suādēre to persuade]
 
dis'suadable
 
adj
 
dis'suader
 
n
 
dis'suasion
 
n
 
dis'suasive
 
adj
 
dis'suasively
 
adv
 
dis'suasiveness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
In fact, your strenuous efforts at dissuasion could end up reinforcing his
  views.
Gone is the time that by keeping nuclear weapons, military dissuasion would be
  automatically guaranteed.
If this is not possible and dissuasion fails, the lawyer must present the
  client's testimony and maintain confidentiality.
Deterrence means dissuasion from an action by threat of unacceptable
  consequences.
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