distaste

[dis-teyst]
noun
1.
dislike; disinclination.
2.
dislike for food or drink.
verb (used with object), distasted, distasting.
3.
Archaic. to dislike.

Origin:
1580–90; dis-1 + taste


1. aversion, repugnance, disgust. See dislike.
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World English Dictionary
distaste (dɪsˈteɪst)
 
n
1.  (often foll by for) an absence of pleasure (in); dislike (of); aversion (to): to look at someone with distaste
 
vb
2.  (tr) an archaic word for dislike

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

distaste
1590s, from dis- + taste.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The nuns who are keepers of this strange congregation look on with pity and
  distaste.
They have the taste for toil, a distaste for pleasure or repose, and the
  telescopic appreciation of distant gain.
But in the succeeding centuries taste quickly became distaste.
With extra copies of the protein at hand, the rats were more likely to remember
  their distaste for sweetener.
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