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divination

[div-uh-ney-shuh n] /ˌdɪv əˈneɪ ʃən/
noun
1.
the practice of attempting to foretell future events or discover hidden knowledge by occult or supernatural means.
2.
augury; prophecy:
The divination of the high priest was fulfilled.
3.
perception by intuition; instinctive foresight.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English divinacioun (< Anglo-French) < Latin dīvīnātiōn- (stem of dīvīnātiō), equivalent to dīvīnāt(us), past participle of dīvīnāre to soothsay (dīvīn- divine + -ātus -ate1) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
divinatory
[dih-vin-uh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /dɪˈvɪn əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/ (Show IPA),
adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for divination
  • But in reality, it's almost always probabilistic, more calculation than divination.
  • Common-sense advice, rather than any divination of high-risk opportunity, is the major task for a retail broker.
  • But as an actor himself, he knows that any divination of truth here has to come primarily from within the performance.
  • But there are other types of weekly cycle as well, usually based on a system of divination.
  • My grandfather had studied and excelled in the arts of divination.
  • The ring thing is of course a form of divination and divining has been busted plenty of times.
  • Yet he never believed or contended that he possessed exclusive powers or an extraordinary divination.
  • Instead, he trusted the omens and divination, or rather he misread the signs from the world of the gods.
  • The old kinships between knowledge and divination, the mirroring reciprocities of language and fact, break off.
  • Suddenly he recognized some of the formularies of a spell or a charm or an utterance of divination.
British Dictionary definitions for divination

divination

/ˌdɪvɪˈneɪʃən/
noun
1.
the art, practice, or gift of discerning or discovering future events or unknown things, as though by supernatural powers
2.
a prophecy
3.
a presentiment or guess
Derived Forms
divinatory (dɪˈvɪnətərɪ; -trɪ) adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for divination
divination
late 14c., from O.Fr. divination (13c.), from L. divinationem (nom. divinatio) "the power of foreseeing, prediction," from divinatus, pp. of divinare, lit. "to be inspired by a god" (see divine (adj.)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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divination in the Bible

of false prophets (Deut. 18:10, 14; Micah 3:6, 7, 11), of necromancers (1 Sam. 28:8), of the Philistine priests and diviners (1 Sam. 6:2), of Balaam (Josh. 13:22). Three kinds of divination are mentioned in Ezek. 21:21, by arrows, consulting with images (the teraphim), and by examining the entrails of animals sacrificed. The practice of this art seems to have been encouraged in ancient Egypt. Diviners also abounded among the aborigines of Canaan and the Philistines (Isa. 2:6; 1 Sam. 28). At a later period multitudes of magicians poured from Chaldea and Arabia into the land of Israel, and pursued their occupations (Isa. 8:19; 2 Kings 21:6; 2 Chr. 33:6). This superstition widely spread, and in the time of the apostles there were "vagabond Jews, exorcists" (Acts 19:13), and men like Simon Magus (Acts 8:9), Bar-jesus (13:6, 8), and other jugglers and impostors (19:19; 2 Tim. 3:13). Every species and degree of this superstition was strictly forbidden by the law of Moses (Ex. 22:18; Lev. 19:26, 31; 20:27; Deut. 18:10, 11). But beyond these various forms of superstition, there are instances of divination on record in the Scriptures by which God was pleased to make known his will. (1.) There was divination by lot, by which, when resorted to in matters of moment, and with solemnity, God intimated his will (Josh. 7:13). The land of Canaan was divided by lot (Num. 26:55, 56); Achan's guilt was detected (Josh. 7:16-19), Saul was elected king (1 Sam. 10:20, 21), and Matthias chosen to the apostleship, by the solem lot (Acts 1:26). It was thus also that the scape-goat was determined (Lev. 16:8-10). (2.) There was divination by dreams (Gen. 20:6; Deut. 13:1, 3; Judg. 7:13, 15; Matt. 1:20; 2:12, 13, 19, 22). This is illustrated in the history of Joseph (Gen. 41:25-32) and of Daniel (2:27; 4:19-28). (3.) By divine appointment there was also divination by the Urim and Thummim (Num. 27:21), and by the ephod. (4.) God was pleased sometimes to vouch-safe direct vocal communications to men (Deut. 34:10; Ex. 3:4; 4:3; Deut. 4:14, 15; 1 Kings 19:12). He also communed with men from above the mercy-seat (Ex. 25:22), and at the door of the tabernacle (Ex. 29:42, 43). (5.) Through his prophets God revealed himself, and gave intimations of his will (2 Kings 13:17; Jer. 51:63, 64).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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