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dizzy

[diz-ee] /ˈdɪz i/
adjective, dizzier, dizziest.
1.
having a sensation of whirling and a tendency to fall; giddy; vertiginous.
2.
bewildered; confused.
3.
causing giddiness or confusion:
a dizzy height.
4.
heedless; thoughtless.
5.
Informal. foolish; silly.
verb (used with object), dizzied, dizzying.
6.
to make dizzy.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English dysy, Old English dysig foolish; cognate with Low German düsig stupefied
Related forms
dizzily, adverb
dizziness, noun

Gillespie

[gi-les-pee] /gɪˈlɛs pi/
noun
1.
John Birks
[burks] /bɜrks/ (Show IPA),
("Dizzy") 1917–93, U.S. jazz trumpeter and composer.

Dean

[deen] /din/
noun
1.
James (Byron) 1931–55, U.S. actor.
2.
Jay Hanna ("Dizzy") 1911–74, U.S. baseball pitcher.
3.
a male given name: from the Old English family name meaning “valley.”.

Disraeli

[diz-rey-lee] /dɪzˈreɪ li/
noun
1.
Benjamin, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield ("Dizzy") 1804–81, British statesman and novelist: prime minister 1868, 1874–80.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for dizzy
  • If blood sugar levels dip too low, a driver may feel dizzy or shaky and become confused or even lose consciousness.
  • dizzy said he fixed the wiring and helped install a new light fixture.
  • dizzy economic growth has not, alas, brought political maturity.
  • With their blood more alkaline than usual, mountaineers can grow dizzy or nauseated.
  • Anyone ever get dizzy by the heat vapor in the room.
  • Yet, after three years in office, voters have begun to feel dizzy.
  • It's impossible to contemplate this for more than thirty seconds without getting physically dizzy.
  • Of course, you can only do it four times in a row before he gets dizzy, so leave some time in between your slashes.
  • He dangles, the blood rushes to his head, he gets dizzy.
  • Taunt my dizzy ears, and beat me violently over the head with whip-stocks.
British Dictionary definitions for dizzy

dizzy

/ˈdɪzɪ/
adjective -zier, -ziest
1.
affected with a whirling or reeling sensation; giddy
2.
mentally confused or bewildered
3.
causing or tending to cause vertigo or bewilderment
4.
(informal) foolish or flighty
verb -zies, -zying, -zied
5.
(transitive) to make dizzy
Derived Forms
dizzily, adverb
dizziness, noun
Word Origin
Old English dysig silly; related to Old High German tusīg weak, Old Norse dos quiet

dean

/diːn/
noun
1.
the chief administrative official of a college or university faculty
2.
(at Oxford and Cambridge universities) a college fellow with responsibility for undergraduate discipline
3.
(mainly Church of England) the head of a chapter of canons and administrator of a cathedral or collegiate church
4.
(RC Church) the cardinal bishop senior by consecration and head of the college of cardinals See also rural dean related adjective decanal
Derived Forms
deanship, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French deien, from Late Latin decānus one set over ten persons, from Latin decem ten

Dean1

/diːn/
noun
1.
Forest of Dean, a forest in W England, in Gloucestershire, between the Rivers Severn and Wye: formerly a royal hunting ground

Dean2

/diːn/
noun
1.
Christopher. See Torvill and Dean
2.
James (Byron). 1931–55, US film actor, who became a cult figure; his films include East of Eden and Rebel Without a Cause (both 1955). He died in a car crash

Disraeli

/dɪzˈreɪlɪ/
noun
1.
Benjamin, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield. 1804–81, British Tory statesman and novelist; prime minister (1868; 1874–80). He gave coherence to the Tory principles of protectionism and imperialism, was responsible for the Reform Bill (1867) and, as prime minister, bought a controlling interest in the Suez Canal. His novels include Coningsby (1844) and Sybil (1845)

Gillespie

/ɡɪˈlɛspɪ/
noun
1.
Dizzy, nickname of John Birks Gillespie. 1917–93, US jazz trumpeter
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dizzy
adj.

Old English dysig "foolish, stupid," from Proto-Germanic *dusijaz (cf. Low German düsig "dizzy," Dutch duizelen "to be dizzy," Old High German dusig "foolish," German Tor "fool," Old English dwæs, Dutch dwaas "foolish"), perhaps from PIE *dheu- (1) "dust, vapor, smoke; to rise in a cloud" (and related notions of "defective perception or wits").

Meaning "having a whirling sensation" is from mid-14c.; that of "giddy" is from c.1500 and seems to merge the two earlier meanings. Used of the "foolish virgins" in early translations of Matthew xxv; used especially of blondes since 1870s. Related: Dizzily.

v.

Old English dysigan, from source of dizzy (adj.). Related: Dizzied; dizzying.

dean

n.

early 14c., from Old French deien (12c., Modern French doyen), from Late Latin decanus "head of a group of 10 monks in a monastery," from earlier secular meaning "commander of 10 soldiers" (which was extended to civil administrators in the late empire), from Greek dekanos, from deka "ten" (see ten). Replaced Old English teoðingealdor. College sense is from 1570s (in Latin from late 13c.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for dizzy

dizzy

adjective

Silly; foolish; inane; ditzy •Found as a noun meaning ''foolish man'' by 1825; now mostly used of women, and esp, since the 1870s, of blondes: some dizzy broad (1501+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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