doctrinal

[dok-truh-nl; British also dok-trahyn-l]
adjective
of, pertaining to, or concerned with doctrine: a doctrinal dispute.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin doctrīnālis, equivalent to Latin doctrīn(a) (see doctrine) + -ālis -al1

doctrinality, noun
doctrinally, adverb
nondoctrinal, adjective
nondoctrinally, adverb
undoctrinal, adjective
undoctrinally, adverb

doctrinal, doctrinaire.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
doctrine (ˈdɒktrɪn)
 
n
1.  a creed or body of teachings of a religious, political, or philosophical group presented for acceptance or belief; dogma
2.  a principle or body of principles that is taught or advocated
 
[C14: from Old French, from Latin doctrīna teaching, from doctor see doctor]
 
doctrinal
 
adj
 
doctrinality
 
n
 
doc'trinally
 
adv
 
'doctrinism
 
n
 
'doctrinist
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

doctrinal
1560s, from L.L. doctrinalis, from doctrina (see doctrine).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Failure was not part of their convictions as long as they followed their
  doctrinal beliefs.
Before he could accept doctrinal statements, his conscience must approve them
  as right and true.
It has a long history of fighting clear of doctrinal commitments and for good
  reasons.
Both regular and irregular armies have some kind of doctrinal base.
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