doctrine

[dok-trin]
noun
1.
a particular principle, position, or policy taught or advocated, as of a religion or government: Catholic doctrines; the Monroe Doctrine.
2.
something that is taught; teachings collectively: religious doctrine.
3.
a body or system of teachings relating to a particular subject: the doctrine of the Catholic Church.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin doctrīna teaching, equivalent to doct(o)r doctor + -īna -ine2

self-doctrine, noun


1. tenet, dogma, theory, precept, belief.
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World English Dictionary
doctrine (ˈdɒktrɪn)
 
n
1.  a creed or body of teachings of a religious, political, or philosophical group presented for acceptance or belief; dogma
2.  a principle or body of principles that is taught or advocated
 
[C14: from Old French, from Latin doctrīna teaching, from doctor see doctor]
 
doctrinal
 
adj
 
doctrinality
 
n
 
doc'trinally
 
adv
 
'doctrinism
 
n
 
'doctrinist
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

doctrine
late 14c., from O.Fr. doctrine (12c.), from L. doctrina "teaching, body of teachings, learning," from doctor "teacher" (see doctor).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The arguments about life's doctrines should ensue from our choices of life's
  purpose.
Theologians call these myths of origin, legends of the fall, and doctrines of
  sin and redemption.
He would be committed to a free press, to tolerance of all doctrines and the
  maximum of tolerance for individual action.
It received these two doctrines at their destined times.
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