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dollar

[dol-er] /ˈdɒl ər/
noun
1.
a paper money, silver or cupronickel coin, and monetary unit of the United States, equal to 100 cents. Symbol: $.
2.
a silver or nickel coin and monetary unit of Canada, equal to 100 cents. Symbol: $.
3.
any of the monetary units of various other nations, as Australia, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Fiji, Guyana, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Liberia, New Zealand, Singapore, the Solomon Islands, Trinidad and Tobago, and Zimbabwe, equal to 100 cents.
4.
Also called ringgit. a cupronickel coin and monetary unit of Brunei, equal to 100 sen.
5.
ringgit (def 1).
6.
a thaler.
7.
a peso.
9.
yuan (def 1).
10.
British Slang.
  1. five-shilling piece; crown.
  2. the sum of five shillings.
Origin
1545-1555
1545-55; earlier daler < Low German, Dutch daler; cognate with German Taler, short for Joachimsthaler coin minted in Joachimsthal in Bohemia
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for dollar
  • Without cap and trade, polluting companies had no motivation to spend money on a multi-million dollar scrubber.
  • More important was the fact that four-dollar-a-gallon gasoline dramatically changed the way people spent their money.
  • For every dollar of state money, the university secures six dollars in federal research money.
  • But the million-dollar club also includes the presidents of a number of colleges with lesser national name recognition.
  • The economy's collapse has caught up with the billion-dollar campaign.
  • They hear how the administration did nothing because it was afraid it might lose its million dollar plus cut of the grant.
  • The following dollar amounts reflect total compensation packages, including deferred pay.
  • In that exercise, not a dollar is raised, but development is happening nonetheless.
  • As a result, the percentage changes refer to a different set of dollar figures than those shown.
  • Beyond making drugs, however, such big-dollar corporate alliances remain rare.
British Dictionary definitions for dollar

dollar

/ˈdɒlə/
noun
1.
the standard monetary unit of the US and its dependencies, divided into 100 cents
2.
the standard monetary unit, comprising 100 cents, of the following countries or territories: Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, Brunei, Canada, the Cayman Islands, Dominica, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, Fiji, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Kiribati, Liberia, Malaysia, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Namibia, Nauru, New Zealand, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Taiwan, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, and Zimbabwe
3.
(Brit, informal) (formerly) five shillings or a coin of this value
4.
(informal) look or feel (like) a million dollars, to look or feel extremely well
Word Origin
C16: from Low German daler, from German Taler, Thaler, short for Joachimsthaler coin made from metal mined in Joachimsthal Jachymov, town now in the Czech Republic
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dollar
n.

1550s, from Low German daler, from German taler (1530s, later thaler), abbreviation of Joachimstaler, literally "(gulden) of Joachimstal," coin minted 1519 from silver from mine opened 1516 near Joachimstal, town in Erzgebirge Mountains in northwest Bohemia. German Tal is cognate with English dale.

The thaler was a large silver coin of varying value in the German states (and a unit of the German monetary union of 1857-73 equal to three marks); it also served as a currency unit in Denmark and Sweden. English colonists in America used the word in reference to Spanish pieces of eight. Continental Congress July 6, 1785, adopted dollar when it set up U.S. currency, on suggestion of Gouverneur Morris and Thomas Jefferson, because the term was widely known but not British. But none were circulated until 1794.

When William M. Evarts was Secretary of State he accompanied Lord Coleridge on an excursion to Mount Vernon. Coleridge remarked that he had heard it said that Washington, standing on the lawn, could throw a dollar clear across the Potomac. Mr. Evarts explained that a dollar would go further in those days than now. [Walsh]
The dollar sign ($) is said to derive from the image of the Pillars of Hercules, stamped with a scroll, on the Spanish piece of eight. Phrase dollars to doughnuts attested from 1890; dollar diplomacy is from 1910.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for dollar
The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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dollar in Technology
character
"$" Common names: ITU-T: dollar sign. Rare: currency symbol; buck; cash; string; escape (when used as the echo of ASCII ESC); ding; cache; INTERCAL: big money.
Well-known uses of the dollar symbol in computing include as a prefix on the names of string variables in BASIC, shell and related languages like Perl. In shell languages it is also used in positional parameters so "$1" is the first parameter to a shell script, "$2" the second, etc.
(2006-09-10)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Idioms and Phrases with dollar

dollar

In addition to the idiom beginning with
dollars
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Article for dollar

originally, a silver coin that circulated in many European countries; in modern times, the name of the standard monetary unit in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and other countries. The Spanish peso, or piece of eight, which circulated in the Spanish and English colonies in America, was known as a dollar by the English-speaking peoples. Familiarity with this coin resulted in the official designation of the United States monetary unit as the dollar in 1792. Canada adopted the dollar and monetary decimal system in 1858; Australia in 1966; and New Zealand in 1967.

Learn more about dollar with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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7
9
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