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downcast

[doun-kast, -kahst] /ˈdaʊnˌkæst, -ˌkɑst/
adjective
1.
directed downward, as the eyes.
2.
dejected in spirit; depressed.
noun
3.
overthrow or ruin.
4.
a downward look or glance.
5.
a shaft down which air passes, as into a mine (opposed to upcast).
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English douncasten. See down1, cast
Related forms
downcastly, adverb
downcastness, noun
Synonyms
2. sad, desolate, disconsolate; low, blue.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for downcast
  • We were downcast for a while after receiving the discouraging news.
  • Still, the private-equity boss was by no means downcast as he sharpened his axe.
  • But colleagues said he did not seem downcast and usually appeared happy.
  • The record shows that she sat through the hearing in silence, her arms folded, her eyes downcast.
  • Vaguely heard or not, the music had its effect on an audience that seemed anything but downcast.
  • Her downcast eye was embellished with a fallen ringlet that threw her brow in shadow.
  • When thus the treasurer had heard the meaning of the ten admonitions, he was unable to find any reply, and sat with downcast eyes.
  • But he was still downcast, uncertain whether he would make the cutoff to apply to top-tier universities.
  • His eyes downcast, he seems to want to sink into its deep red damask covering.
  • The populace was utterly downcast, for this presaged the extinction of the tribe.
British Dictionary definitions for downcast

downcast

/ˈdaʊnˌkɑːst/
adjective
1.
dejected
2.
(esp of the eyes) directed downwards
noun
3.
(mining) a ventilation shaft
4.
(geology) another word for downthrow
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for downcast
adj.

c.1600, from past participle of obsolete verb downcast (c.1300), from down (adv.) + cast (v.). Literal at first; figurative sense is 1630s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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