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drear

[dreer] /drɪər/
adjective, Literary.
1.
Origin of drear
1620-1630
1620-30; back formation from dreary
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for drear
Historical Examples
  • The glass in the hood of the hansom kept out the biting rain, but the drear approach of a wet evening was not to be denied.

    Nedra George Barr McCutcheon
  • Between was the plain, and the plain was a place of drear sound—oh, of drear sound!

    The Long Roll Mary Johnston
  • The sad scene must have been repeated many times in that long, drear winter.

    Strangers and Wayfarers Sarah Orne Jewett
  • Must her life be drear and wintry, except as she rambles into the pleasaunce of others?

    Floyd Grandon's Honor Amanda Minnie Douglas
  • They reached their destination in the drear dead of midnight.

  • October drifted into November and the chill, drear days came.

  • Only we shall all be back at Westminster again in drear November.

  • It all seemed dark and drear, and not a gleam of sunshine in sight.

    Bulbs and Blossoms Amy Le Feuvre
  • I seem suddenly lifted out of a drear monotony of unchanging days, back to a life of extraordinary vitality and promise.

    The Wasted Generation Owen Johnson
  • I was in trouble and you have relieved me nobly and at a time when all seemed dark and drear.

    Roughing It Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)
Word Origin and History for drear
adj.

1620s, poetic shortening of dreary.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for drear

6
6
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