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droll

[drohl] /droʊl/
adjective, droller, drollest.
1.
amusing in an odd way; whimsically humorous; waggish.
noun
2.
a droll person; jester; wag.
verb (used without object)
3.
Archaic. to jest; joke.
Origin of droll
1615-1625
1615-25; < Middle French drolle pleasant rascal < Middle Dutch drol a fat little man
Related forms
drollness, noun
drolly, adverb
Synonyms
1. diverting, odd, witty. See amusing. 2, 3. clown.
Antonyms
1. serious.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for droll
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • It was so seldom that Ree joked, and he spoke now in so droll a way, that Tom Fish laughed boisterously.

    Far Past the Frontier James A. Braden
  • Though you stoop your head over your work, I see that you have some droll thought.

    The Hour and the Man Harriet Martineau
  • I never saw but one other man whose quiet, droll look excited in me the same disposition to laugh, and that was Artemus Ward.

    A Cousin's Conspiracy Horatio Alger
  • This idea seemed so droll that he could not refrain from smiling.

    The Crystal Hunters George Manville Fenn
  • The little one gave her voice a droll inflection as she briskly replied, Oh dear no, thank you; Im very comfortable indeed.

British Dictionary definitions for droll

droll

/drəʊl/
adjective
1.
amusing in a quaint or odd manner; comical
Derived Forms
drollness, noun
drolly, adverb
Word Origin
C17: from French drôle scamp, from Middle Dutch: imp
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for droll
adj.

1620s, from French drôle "odd, comical, funny" (1580s), in Middle French a noun meaning "a merry fellow," possibly from Middle Dutch drol "fat little fellow, goblin," or Middle High German trolle "clown," ultimately from Old Norse troll "giant, troll" (see troll (n.)). Related: Drolly; drollish.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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