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dromedary

[drom-i-der-ee, druhm-] /ˈdrɒm ɪˌdɛr i, ˈdrʌm-/
noun, plural dromedaries.
1.
the single-humped camel, Camelus dromedarius, of Arabia and northern Africa.
Compare Bactrian camel.
Origin of dromedary
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English dromedarie, -ary (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin dromedārius (camēlus) < Greek dromad- (stem of dromás) running + Latin -ārius -ary
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for dromedary
Historical Examples
  • I went to see a dromedary, a very monstrous beast, much like the camel, but larger.

  • "That's the boy who called me a dromedary," said Hibbert, as they turned away.

    The Hero of Garside School J. Harwood Panting
  • A dromedary flashing up the sands,—spray of the dry ocean sailed by the "ship of the desert."

    The Professor at the Breakfast Table Oliver Wendell Holmes (Sr.)
  • There, on the dromedary, is the emperor's great warrior who commands the Romans in Pharan.

    Homo Sum, Complete Georg Ebers
  • Shah Sevar pulls up his dromedary and orders a halt in muffled tones, as though he feared that his voice might be heard in Bam.

    From Pole to Pole Sven Anders Hedin
  • The dromedary has long and deservedly been called "the Ship of the Desert."

    Heads and Tales Various
  • The dromedary that brought me here is the fleetest in all the land of Shinar.

    Sarchedon G. J. (George John) Whyte-Melville
  • "At a class reunion I once chased a trolley-car on a dromedary," he said hopefully.

    Wanted: A Husband Samuel Hopkins Adams
  • So saying, he let the grateful sunlight into the dromedary's innards.

    Humour of the North Lawrence J. Burpee
  • Supporters: dexter, a dromedary; sinister, an elephant, both proper.

    A Complete Guide to Heraldry Arthur Charles Fox-Davies
British Dictionary definitions for dromedary

dromedary

/ˈdrʌmədərɪ; -drɪ; ˈdrɒm-/
noun (pl) -daries
1.
a type of Arabian camel bred for racing and riding, having a single hump and long slender legs
2.
another name for Arabian camel
Word Origin
C14: from Late Latin dromedārius (camēlus), from Greek dromas running
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dromedary
n.

late 13c., from Old French dromedaire, from Late Latin dromedarius "kind of camel," from Latin dromas (genitive dromados), from Greek dromas kamelos "running camel," from dromos "a race course," from PIE *drem-, from possible base *der- "to run, walk, step" (cf. Sanskrit dramati "runs, goes," Greek dromas "running," Middle High German tremen "to rock, shake, sway"). One-humped Arabian camels were bred and trained for riding. An early variant was drumbledairy (1560s).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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dromedary in the Bible

(Isa. 60:6), an African or Arabian species of camel having only one hump, while the Bactrian camel has two. It is distinguished from the camel only as a trained saddle-horse is distinguished from a cart-horse. It is remarkable for its speed (Jer. 2:23). Camels are frequently spoken of in partriarchal times (Gen. 12:16; 24:10; 30:43; 31:17, etc.). They were used for carrying burdens (Gen. 37:25; Judg. 6:5), and for riding (Gen. 24:64). The hair of the camel falls off of itself in spring, and is woven into coarse cloths and garments (Matt. 3:4). (See CAMEL.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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