droop

[droop]
verb (used without object)
1.
to sag, sink, bend, or hang down, as from weakness, exhaustion, or lack of support.
2.
to fall into a state of physical weakness; flag; fail.
3.
to lose spirit or courage.
4.
to descend, as the sun; sink.
verb (used with object)
5.
to let sink or drop: an eagle drooping its wings.
noun
6.
a sagging, sinking, bending, or hanging down, as from weakness, exhaustion, or lack of support.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English drupen, drowpen < Old Norse drūpa; akin to drop

droopingly, adverb
redroop, verb (used without object)
undrooping, adjective


1. flag, languish. 2. weaken, decline, faint, wilt, wither, fade.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
droop (druːp)
 
vb
1.  to sag or allow to sag, as from weakness or exhaustion; hang down; sink
2.  (intr) to be overcome by weariness; languish; flag
3.  (intr) to lose courage; become dejected
 
n
4.  the act or state of drooping
 
[C13: from Old Norse drūpa; see drop]
 
'drooping
 
adj
 
'droopingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

droop
c.1300, from O.N. drupa "to drop," from P.Gmc. *drup-, from PIE *dhreub, related to O.E. dropian "to drop." Related: Drooping.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The jiggling bike and rather thin-edged basket caused the camera to droop, and
  you can see it being repositioned a few times.
Tongues of dark tan sediment droop into the lighter-colored layer below.
Bond prices surge on bad economic news and droop when the economy rallies.
Telephone wires droop above broad swathes of vacant land.
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