Drumming_out

World English Dictionary
drum1 (drʌm)
 
n
1.  music a percussion instrument sounded by striking a membrane stretched across the opening of a hollow cylinder or hemisphere
2.  informal beat the drum for to attempt to arouse interest in
3.  the sound produced by a drum or any similar sound
4.  an object that resembles a drum in shape, such as a large spool or a cylindrical container
5.  architect
 a.  one of a number of cylindrical blocks of stone used to construct the shaft of a column
 b.  the wall or structure supporting a dome or cupola
6.  short for eardrum
7.  Also called: drumfish any of various North American marine and freshwater sciaenid fishes, such as Equetus pulcher (striped drum), that utter a drumming sound
8.  a type of hollow rotor for steam turbines or axial compressors
9.  computing See disk a rotating cylindrical device on which data may be stored for later retrieval: now mostly superseded by disks
10.  archaic a drummer
11.  informal (Austral) the drum the necessary information (esp in the phrase give (someone) the drum)
 
vb (sometimes foll by up) , drums, drumming, drummed
12.  to play (music) on or as if on a drum
13.  to beat or tap (the fingers) rhythmically or regularly
14.  (intr) (of birds) to produce a rhythmic sound, as by beating the bill against a tree, branch, etc
15.  to summon or call by drumming
16.  (tr) to instil by constant repetition: to drum an idea into someone's head
 
[C16: probably from Middle Dutch tromme, of imitative origin]

Collins
World English Dictionary
drum2 (drʌm)
 
n
(Scot), (Irish) a narrow ridge or hill
 
[C18: from Scottish Gaelic druim]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

drum
early 15c., from M.Du. tromme "drum," probably of imitative origin. Not common before 1570s. To drum up (business, etc.) is Amer.Eng. 1839, from the old way of drawing a crowd.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

drum (drŭm)
n.
See eardrum.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
Slang Dictionary

drum

adj, n. Ancient techspeak term referring to slow, cylindrical magnetic media that were once state-of-the-art storage devices. Under BSD Unix the disk partition used for swapping is still called `/dev/drum'; this has led to considerable humor and not a few straight-faced but utterly bogus `explanations' getting foisted on newbies. See also "The Story of Mel" in Appendix A.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;