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drupe

[droop] /drup/
noun, Botany
1.
any fruit, as a peach, cherry, plum, etc., consisting of an outer skin, a usually pulpy and succulent middle layer, and a hard and woody inner shell usually enclosing a single seed.
Origin of drupe
1745-1755
1745-55; < Latin drūpa, druppa overripe olive < Greek drýppa olive
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for drupe
Historical Examples
  • This tribe is distinguished by the fruit, which is what botanists call a drupe, that is, a stone fruit.

    Botany for Ladies Jane Loudon
  • The flowers are small and insignificant; and the fruit is a drupe.

    Botany for Ladies Jane Loudon
  • The fruit is a drupe, that is, it consists of a fleshy husk enclosing a nut.

    Botany for Ladies Jane Loudon
  • The Almond fruit is a drupe, like the peach, but the flesh is thin and hard and the pit is the Almond of commerce.

  • The drupe, or Stone-fruit; of which the cherry, plum, and peach (Fig. 375) are familiar examples.

  • The drupe or stone-fruit, which consists of a hard stone surrounded by a fleshy covering, as the plum and the cherry.

    Field and Woodland Plants William S. Furneaux
  • The drupe is in this species round, with red skin and juicy flesh of a distinctly acid character.

  • We will then take them first into our consideration, and begin by giving an account of what is the structure of a drupe.

  • drupe globose, 1–2″ in diameter, covered by a fleshy envelope, formed by the receptacle.

  • It was while the manager was deciding which of three other young women to take that Mr. drupe was stricken with apoplexy.

    Duffels Edward Eggleston
British Dictionary definitions for drupe

drupe

/druːp/
noun
1.
an indehiscent fruit consisting of outer epicarp, fleshy or fibrous mesocarp, and stony endocarp enclosing a single seed, as in the peach, plum, and cherry
Derived Forms
drupaceous (druːˈpeɪʃəs) adjective
Word Origin
C18: from Latin druppa wrinkled overripe olive, from Greek: olive
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for drupe
n.

1753, from Modern Latin drupa "stone-fruit," from Latin drupa (oliva) "wrinkled olive," from Greek dryppa, short for drypepes "tree-ripened," from drys "tree" + pepon "ripe" (see pumpkin).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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drupe in Science
drupe
  (drp)   
A simple fruit derived from a single carpel. A drupe usually contains a single seed enclosed by a hardened endocarp, which often adheres closely to the seed within. In peaches, plums, cherries, and olives, a fleshy edible mesocarp surrounds the endocarp (the pit or stone). In the coconut, a fibrous mesocarp (the husk) surrounds the endocarp (the shell), while the white edible portion is the endosperm. Compare berry, pome. See more at simple fruit.

The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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