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dynamics

[dahy-nam-iks] /daɪˈnæm ɪks/
noun
1.
(used with a singular verb) Physics. the branch of mechanics that deals with the motion and equilibrium of systems under the action of forces, usually from outside the system.
2.
(used with a plural verb) the motivating or driving forces, physical or moral, in any field.
3.
(used with a plural verb) the pattern or history of growth, change, and development in any field.
4.
(used with a plural verb) variation and gradation in the volume of musical sound.
5.
(used with a singular verb) psychodynamics.
Origin
1780-1790
1780-90; see dynamic, -ics

dynamic

[dahy-nam-ik] /daɪˈnæm ɪk/
adjective, Also, dynamical
1.
pertaining to or characterized by energy or effective action; vigorously active or forceful; energetic:
the dynamic president of the firm.
2.
Physics.
  1. of or relating to force or power.
  2. of or relating to force related to motion.
3.
pertaining to the science of dynamics.
4.
of or relating to the range of volume of musical sound.
5.
Computers. (of data storage, processing, or programming) affected by the passage of time or the presence or absence of power: Dynamic memory must be constantly refreshed to avoid losing data.
Dynamic websites contain Web pages that are generated in real time.
6.
Grammar, nonstative.
noun
7.
a basic or dynamic force, especially one that motivates, affects development or stability, etc.
Origin
1810-20; < French dynamique < Greek dynamikós, equivalent to dýnam(is) force, power + -ikos -ic
Related forms
dynamically, adverb
nondynamic, adjective
nondynamical, adjective
nondynamically, adverb
undynamic, adjective
undynamically, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for dynamics
  • He is semi-aware of a lot of the emotional dynamics around him.
  • Polynesian societies were well versed in the population dynamics of fish and knew when to hold back their fishing.
  • The normal cycle appeared to have been disrupted, which would have required a major rethink of the sun's internal dynamics.
  • Markets are otherwise supposed to have no real internal dynamics of their own.
  • Imperialism, nationalism, and militarism have been called the dynamics.
  • Perhaps the psychological focus of the "dynamics of bullying" is too narrow.
  • With lots of family dynamics and competing story lines, Katie's journey to true fulfillment in both love and faith loses impact.
  • We are seeking an individual with expertise in fluid dynamics and control theory.
  • But here, too, the dynamics seem to be changing.
  • The result is neither an attack on the rich nor a lecture to the poor, but a thoughtful consideration of class dynamics.
British Dictionary definitions for dynamics

dynamics

/daɪˈnæmɪks/
noun
1.
(functioning as sing) the branch of mechanics concerned with the forces that change or produce the motions of bodies Compare statics, kinematics
2.
(functioning as sing) the branch of mechanics that includes statics and kinetics See statics, kinetics
3.
(functioning as sing) the branch of any science concerned with forces
4.
those forces that produce change in any field or system
5.
(music)
  1. the various degrees of loudness called for in performance
  2. Also called dynamic marks, dynamic markings. directions and symbols used to indicate degrees of loudness

dynamic

/daɪˈnæmɪk/
adjective
1.
of or concerned with energy or forces that produce motion, as opposed to static
2.
of or concerned with dynamics
3.
Also dynamical. characterized by force of personality, ambition, energy, new ideas, etc
4.
(music) of, relating to, or indicating dynamics: dynamic marks
5.
(computing) (of a memory) needing its contents refreshed periodically Compare static (sense 8)
Derived Forms
dynamically, adverb
Word Origin
C19: from French dynamique, from Greek dunamikos powerful, from dunamis power, from dunasthai to be able
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for dynamics
n.

as a branch of physics, 1789, from dynamic (adj.); also see -ics.

dynamic

adj.

1817 as a term in philosophy; 1827 in the sense "pertaining to force producing motion" (the opposite of static), from French dynamique introduced by German mathematician Gottfried Leibnitz (1646-1716) in 1691 from Greek dynamikos "powerful," from dynamis "power," from dynasthai "to be able, to have power, be strong enough," of unknown origin. The figurative sense of "active, potent, energetic" is from 1856 (in Emerson). Related: Dynamically.

n.

"energetic force; motive force," 1894, from dynamic (adj.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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dynamics in Medicine

dynamics dy·nam·ics (dī-nām'ĭks)
n.

  1. See kinetics.

  2. Psychodynamics.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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dynamics in Science
dynamics
  (dī-nām'ĭks)   
The branch of physics that deals with the effects of forces on the motions of bodies. Also called kinetics. Compare kinematics.
dynamic
  (dī-nām'ĭk)   
  1. Relating to energy or to objects in motion. Compare static.

  2. Relating to the study of dynamics.

  3. Characterized by continuous change or activity.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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