dysphagia

dysphagia

[dis-fey-juh, -jee-uh]
noun Pathology.
difficulty in swallowing.

Origin:
1775–85; < Neo-Latin < Greek dys- dys- + phag(eîn) to eat, devour + -ia -ia

dysphagic [dis-faj-ik, -fey-jik] , adjective

dysphagia, dysphasia.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
dysphagia (dɪsˈfeɪdʒɪə)
 
n
difficulty in swallowing, caused by obstruction or spasm of the oesophagus
 
[C18: New Latin, from dys- + Greek -phagos; see phago-]
 
dysphagic
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

dysphagia dys·pha·gia (dĭs-fā'jə, -jē-ə) or dys·pha·gy (dĭs'fə-jē)
n.
Difficulty in swallowing or inability to swallow. Also called aglutition, aphagia, odynophagia.


dys·phag'ic (-fāj'ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
dysphagia   (dĭs-fā'jə)  Pronunciation Key 
Difficulty in swallowing.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

dysphagia

difficulty or pain in swallowing, caused by lesions or stricture of the upper digestive tract, obstruction of the upper digestive tract by tumours or foreign bodies, or disturbances in the nervous or muscular control of swallowing. Obstruction of the esophagus is the most common cause of dysphagia. People with dysphagia may experience a sensation that food or liquid is lodged in the upper digestive tract. The cause of dysphagia may be treated with medication or surgery; patients may also benefit from speech therapy.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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