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economic

[ek-uh-nom-ik, ee-kuh-] /ˌɛk əˈnɒm ɪk, ˌi kə-/
adjective
1.
pertaining to the production, distribution, and use of income, wealth, and commodities.
2.
of or pertaining to the science of economics.
3.
pertaining to an economy, or system of organization or operation, especially of the process of production.
4.
involving or pertaining to one's personal resources of money:
to give up a large house for economic reasons.
5.
pertaining to use as a resource in the economy:
economic entomology; economic botany.
6.
affecting or apt to affect the welfare of material resources:
weevils and other economic pests.
Origin
1585-1595
1585-95; (< Middle French economique) < Latin oeconomicus < Greek oikonomikós relating to household management, equivalent to oikonóm(os) steward (oîko(s) house + nómos manager) + -ikos -ic
Related forms
antieconomic, adjective
noneconomic, adjective
preeconomic, adjective
quasi-economic, adjective
subeconomic, adjective
uneconomic, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for economic
  • For colleges the past year's global economic crisis was much bigger-and wetter-than your typical financial downturn.
  • Double dip is not a term that a government keen to extricate itself from the economic-crisis-management business likes to hear.
  • For many economists, small business lending is the safest gauge of the economic recovery's strength.
  • We have the highest economic growth of any of the world's major industrialized nations.
  • The present economic mess may be the result of changes made since the 1980s.
  • Almost as soon as the economic meltdown began, the ominous warnings started.
  • In these tough economic times, consumers are looking for bargains and offers for free shipping.
  • Almost every antitrust case presents economic as well as legal questions.
  • Most economists would say that giving gifts, other than cash, makes no economic sense.
  • It sounds like it's economic potential is still theoretical, .
British Dictionary definitions for economic

economic

/ˌiːkəˈnɒmɪk; ˌɛkə-/
adjective
1.
of or relating to an economy, economics, or finance economic development, economic theories
2.
(Brit) capable of being produced, operated, etc, for profit; profitable the firm is barely economic
3.
concerning or affecting material resources or welfare economic pests
4.
concerned with or relating to the necessities of life; utilitarian
5.
a variant of economical
6.
(informal) inexpensive; cheap
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for economic
adj.

1590s, "pertaining to management of a household," perhaps shortened from economical or from French économique or directly from Latin oeconomicus "of domestic economy," from Greek oikonomikos "practiced in the management of a household or family," hence, "frugal, thrifty," from oikonomia (see economy (n.)). Meaning "relating to the science of economics" is from 1835 and now is the main sense, economical retaining the older one of "characterized by thrift."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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