electrum

[ih-lek-truhm]
noun
1.
an amber-colored alloy of gold and silver used in ancient times.
2.
an alloy composed of about 50 percent copper, 30 percent nickel, and 20 percent zinc.
3.
German silver; nickel silver.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin < Greek ḗlektron amber, alloy of gold and silver

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World English Dictionary
electrum (ɪˈlɛktrəm)
 
n
an alloy of gold (55--88 per cent) and silver used for jewellery and ornaments
 
[C14: from Latin, from Greek ēlektron amber]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

electrum
"alloy of gold and silver," late 14c. (in O.E. elehtre), from L., lit. "amber," so called probably for its pale yellow color.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Gold mineralization occurs as electrum and is enclosed in pyrite.
Electrum in vein-controlled ore may be visible to fine-grained.
Gold varies from fine-grained to microscopic and grades into electrum.
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