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emancipation

[ih-man-suh-pey-shuh n] /ɪˌmæn səˈpeɪ ʃən/
noun
1.
the act of emancipating.
2.
the state or fact of being emancipated.
Origin
1625-1635
1625-35; < Latin ēmancipātiōn- (stem of ēmancipātiō), equivalent to ēmancipāt(us) (see emancipate) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
nonemancipation, noun
preemancipation, noun
self-emancipation, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for emancipation
  • The question of emancipation has been deeply and candidly pondered.
  • Doing without the Fund is indeed an economic emancipation.
  • In the Northern states the result was gradual emancipation.
  • She promoted democracy and women's emancipation.
  • As everywhere, a flourishing nightlife marked this period of intense emancipation.
  • Many educated and, otherwise, sensible persons appeared to believe that emancipation meant social equality.
  • From the day on which the emancipation of our literature was accomplished, the purification of our literature began.
  • The journey to emancipation would be less daunting if there were a consensus among politicians on the need.
  • And yet, as the nineteenth century wore on, emancipation increasingly appeared an illusion.
  • The war cloud had thinned enough to allow a clearer conception of the work of emancipation.
British Dictionary definitions for emancipation

emancipation

/ɪˌmænsɪˈpeɪʃən/
noun
1.
the act of freeing or state of being freed; liberation
2.
(informal) freedom from inhibition and convention
Derived Forms
emancipationist, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for emancipation
n.

1630s, "a setting free," from French émancipation, from Latin emancipationem (nominative emancipatio), noun of action from past participle stem of emancipare (see emancipate). Specifically with reference to U.S. slavery from 1785. In Britain, with reference to easing of restrictions on Catholics, etc.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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