embarkation

[em-bahr-key-shuhn]
noun
the act, process, or an instance of embarking.


Origin:
1635–45; < French embarcation < Spanish embarcación. See embark, -ation

nonembarkation, noun
reembarkation, noun
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World English Dictionary
embark (ɛmˈbɑːk)
 
vb
1.  to board (a ship or aircraft)
2.  (intr; usually foll by on or upon) to commence or engage (in) a new project, venture, etc
 
[C16: via French from Old Provençal embarcar, from em- + barca boat, barque]
 
embar'kation
 
n
 
em'barkment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

embarkation
1640s, from Fr. embarcation, from embarquer (see embark).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Any embarkation could be a dead end, forcing me to retreat and replan my route.
There were no clinical signs of contagious equine metritis detected in the animals prior to embarkation.
Embarkation and debarkation, cargo loading and discharge.
The data includes both arrivals and departures and are detailed by country and port of debarkation and embarkation.
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