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embody

[em-bod-ee] /ɛmˈbɒd i/
verb (used with object), embodied, embodying.
1.
to give a concrete form to; express, personify, or exemplify in concrete form:
to embody an idea in an allegorical painting.
2.
to provide with a body; incarnate; make corporeal:
to embody a spirit.
3.
to collect into or include in a body; organize; incorporate.
4.
to embrace or comprise.
Also, imbody.
Origin of embody
1540-1550
1540-50; em-1 + body
Related forms
embodier, noun
preembody, verb (used with object), preembodied, preembodying.
reembody, verb (used with object), reembodied, reembodying.
well-embodied, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for embody
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • They embody conjectures of later copyists, or traditions which are without foundation.

    Who Wrote the Bible? Washington Gladden
  • Yet the English have contrived to embody all these in one word, and that word my name!'

    Lord Kilgobbin Charles Lever
  • Nor do the figures of this deity or supposed deity appear to embody throughout the same idea.

  • It seemed to me to embody the banquet there set before my mental appetite.

    The Plum Tree David Graham Phillips
  • She seemed to embody the warmth and sanity of the new life for which he was to save Tony.

    The Third Window Anne Douglas Sedgwick
British Dictionary definitions for embody

embody

/ɪmˈbɒdɪ/
verb (transitive) -bodies, -bodying, -bodied
1.
to give a tangible, bodily, or concrete form to (an abstract concept)
2.
to be an example of or express (an idea, principle, etc), esp in action: his gentleness embodies a Christian ideal
3.
(often foll by in) to collect or unite in a comprehensive whole, system, etc; comprise; include: all the different essays were embodied in one long article
4.
to invest (a spiritual entity) with a body or with bodily form; render incarnate
Derived Forms
embodiment, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for embody
v.

1540s, in reference to a soul or spirit invested with a physical form; of principles, ideas, etc., from 1660s; from en- (1) "in" + body. Related: Embodied; embodying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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