emboss

[em-baws, -bos]
verb (used with object)
1.
to raise or represent (surface designs) in relief.
2.
to decorate (a surface) with raised ornament.
3.
Metalworking. to raise a design on (a blank) with dies of similar pattern, one the negative of the other. Compare coin ( def 10 ).
4.
to cause to bulge out; make protuberant.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English embosen < Middle French embocer, equivalent to em- em-1 + boce boss2

embossable, adjective
embosser, noun
embossment, noun
unembossed, adjective
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World English Dictionary
emboss (ɪmˈbɒs)
 
vb
1.  to mould or carve (a decoration or design) on (a surface) so that it is raised above the surface in low relief
2.  to cause to bulge; make protrude
 
[C14: from Old French embocer, from em- + boceboss²]
 
em'bosser
 
n
 
em'bossment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

emboss
late 14c., from O.Fr. embocer, from boce "knoblike mass" (see boss (2)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Participating drugs companies emboss a special code onto packages, which customers find by scratching off a coating.
Jacket design is what helped emboss books with a cool factor hitherto lacking.
The light grade, however, is recommended as easier to emboss by slate and stylus.
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