emboss

[em-baws, -bos]
verb (used with object)
1.
to raise or represent (surface designs) in relief.
2.
to decorate (a surface) with raised ornament.
3.
Metalworking. to raise a design on (a blank) with dies of similar pattern, one the negative of the other. Compare coin ( def 10 ).
4.
to cause to bulge out; make protuberant.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English embosen < Middle French embocer, equivalent to em- em-1 + boce boss2

embossable, adjective
embosser, noun
embossment, noun
unembossed, adjective
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World English Dictionary
emboss (ɪmˈbɒs)
 
vb
1.  to mould or carve (a decoration or design) on (a surface) so that it is raised above the surface in low relief
2.  to cause to bulge; make protrude
 
[C14: from Old French embocer, from em- + boceboss²]
 
em'bosser
 
n
 
em'bossment
 
n

embossed (ɪmˈbɒst)
 
adj
having a moulded or carved decoration or design on the surface so that it is raised above the surface in low relief

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

emboss
late 14c., from O.Fr. embocer, from boce "knoblike mass" (see boss (2)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The timing, my economics major, and the embossed paper thing all pointed in
  that direction.
Cedar-lap siding, wooden sidewalks, embossed tin ceilings.
The embossed felt rug was made by molding wet wool over bowls and other
  circular shapes.
And even if the original name is embossed on the ship's bow or stern in raised
  steel, that is no great obstacle.
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