enable

[en-ey-buhl]
verb (used with object), enabled, enabling.
1.
to make able; give power, means, competence, or ability to; authorize: This document will enable him to pass through the enemy lines unmolested.
2.
to make possible or easy: Aeronautics enables us to overcome great distances.
3.
to make ready; equip (often used in combination): Web-enabled cell phones.

Origin:
1375–1425; Middle English; see en-1, able

enabler, noun
preenable, verb (used with object), preenabled, preenabling.


1. empower, qualify, allow, permit.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
enable (ɪnˈeɪbəl)
 
vb
1.  to provide (someone) with adequate power, means, opportunity, or authority (to do something)
2.  to make possible
3.  to put (a digital electronic circuit element) into an operative condition by supplying a suitable input pulse
 
en'ablement
 
n
 
en'abler
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

enable
mid-15c., from en- "make, put in" + able. Related: Enabled; enabling.

enabler
1610s, agent noun from enable.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The role of the professor now is part party host, part traffic cop, full-time
  enabler.
My husband refuses to play enabler, and my sister picks up on this and resents
  him for it.
We can laugh and engage with technology as an enabler.
The energy density of batteries is tremendously important as an enabler of new
  technologies.
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