endometritis

endometritis

[en-doh-mi-trahy-tis]
noun Pathology.
inflammation of the lining of the uterus.

Origin:
1870–75; < Neo-Latin; see endometrium, -itis

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Collins
World English Dictionary
endometritis (ˌɛndəʊmɪˈtraɪtɪs)
 
n
inflammation of the endometrium, which is caused by infection, as by bacteria, foreign bodies, etc

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

endometritis en·do·me·tri·tis (ěn'dō-mĭ-trī'tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the endometrium.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

endometritis

inflammation of the endometrium, the mucous lining of the uterus. Endometritis is most commonly caused by infection with sexually transmitted organisms such as Chlamydia (and in these cases is known as pelvic inflammatory disease). The condition may be asymptomatic or may cause nonspecific signs such as abnormal vaginal bleeding, general discomfort, fever, and lower abdominal or pelvic pain. When endometritis occurs in conjunction with salpingitis (inflammation of the fallopian tubes) or cervicitis (inflammation of the uterine cervix), symptoms may be more notable and more severe. Another type of endometritis may occur after any gynecological procedure, including childbirth, abortion, and insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD), and can lead to puerperal sepsis and even death, as was common in the early 19th century, before aseptic practice in hospitals was widely employed. Treatment of endometritis is with antibiotics.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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