entertain

[en-ter-teyn]
verb (used with object)
1.
to hold the attention of pleasantly or agreeably; divert; amuse.
2.
to have as a guest; provide food, lodging, etc., for; show hospitality to.
3.
to admit into the mind; consider: He never entertained such ideas.
4.
to hold in the mind; harbor; cherish: They secretly entertained thoughts of revenge.
5.
Archaic. to maintain or keep up.
6.
Obsolete. to give admittance or reception to; receive.
verb (used without object)
7.
to exercise hospitality; entertain company; provide entertainment for guests: They loved to talk, dance, and entertain.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English entertenen to hold mutually < Middle French entretenirVulgar Latin *intertenēre, equivalent to Latin inter- inter- + tenēre to hold

overentertained, adjective
preentertain, verb (used with object)
unentertained, adjective
well-entertained, adjective


1. beguile, regale. See amuse.


1. bore. 3. reject.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
entertain (ˌɛntəˈteɪn)
 
vb
1.  to provide amusement for (a person or audience)
2.  to show hospitality to (guests)
3.  (tr) to hold in the mind: to entertain an idea
 
[C15: from Old French entretenir, from entre- mutually + tenir to hold, from Latin tenēre]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

entertain
late 15c., "to keep up, maintain," from M.Fr. entretenir, from O.Fr. entretenir "hold together, support," from entre- "among" (from L. inter) + tenir "to hold" (from L. tenere; see tenet). Sense of "have a guest" is late 15c.; that of "amuse" is 1620s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Entertain definition


Entertainments, "feasts," were sometimes connected with a public festival (Deut. 16:11, 14), and accompanied by offerings (1 Sam. 9:13), in token of alliances (Gen. 26:30); sometimes in connection with domestic or social events, as at the weaning of children (Gen. 21:8), at weddings (Gen. 29:22; John 2:1), on birth-days (Matt. 14:6), at the time of sheep-shearing (2 Sam. 13:23), and of vintage (Judg. 9:27), and at funerals (2 Sam. 3:35; Jer. 16:7). The guests were invited by servants (Prov. 9:3; Matt. 22:3), who assigned them their respective places (1 Sam. 9:22; Luke 14:8; Mark 12:39). Like portions were sent by the master to each guest (1 Sam. 1:4; 2 Sam. 6:19), except when special honour was intended, when the portion was increased (Gen. 43:34). The Israelites were forbidden to attend heathenish sacrificial entertainments (Ex. 34:15), because these were in honour of false gods, and because at such feast they would be liable to partake of unclean flesh (1 Cor. 10:28). In the entertainments common in apostolic times among the Gentiles were frequent "revellings," against which Christians were warned (Rom. 13:13; Gal. 5:21; 1 Pet. 4:3). (See BANQUET.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
We are committed to presenting exhibits that will entertain and educate our
  local community and visitors from around the world.
The two-legged machines even dance during a halftime performance to entertain
  the crowd.
When it comes to trade, governments entertain no presumption that people might
  actually know for themselves what is best.
While skittish on land, they will entertain me for hours underwater.
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