entireness

entire

[en-tahyuhr]
adjective
1.
having all the parts or elements; whole; complete: He wrote the entire novel in only six weeks.
2.
full or thorough: He has been given entire freedom of choice in this matter.
3.
not broken, mutilated, or decayed; intact: We were fortunate to find this relic entire.
4.
unimpaired or undiminished: His entire energies have gone into making the enterprise a success.
5.
being wholly of one piece; undivided; continuous: The entire mood of the symphony was joyful.
6.
Botany. without notches or indentations, as leaves.
7.
not gelded: an entire horse.
8.
Obsolete. wholly of one kind; unmixed or pure.
noun
9.
Archaic. the whole; entirety.
10.
an ungelded animal, especially a stallion.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English entere < Middle French entier < Latin integrum, accusative of integer whole; see integer

entireness, noun
subentire, adjective


1. See complete.


1. partial. 3. defective.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To entireness
Collins
World English Dictionary
entire (ɪnˈtaɪə)
 
adj
1.  (prenominal) whole; complete: the entire project is going well
2.  (prenominal) without reservation or exception; total: you have my entire support
3.  not broken or damaged; intact
4.  consisting of a single piece or section; undivided; continuous
5.  (of leaves, petals, etc) having a smooth margin not broken up into teeth or lobes
6.  not castrated: an entire horse
7.  obsolete of one substance or kind; unmixed; pure
 
n
8.  a less common word for entirety
9.  an uncastrated horse
10.  philately
 a.  a complete item consisting of an envelope, postcard, or wrapper with stamps affixed
 b.  on entire (of a stamp) placed on an envelope, postcard, etc, and bearing postal directions
 
[C14: from Old French entier, from Latin integer whole, from in-1 + tangere to touch]
 
en'tireness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

entire
late 14c., from O.Fr. entier "whole, complete," from L. integrum (nom. integer) "whole, complete," lit. "untouched," from in- "not" + root of tangere "to touch" (see tangent).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;